8 IITs, 7 IIms, 16 CUs, 10 NITs added since 2004: PM India

If the Government thinks that it’s not possible to deliver uniform quality of Higher Education across India, then it should stop sending every youth in the country to the college.

 

In his Independence day speech from the Red Fort, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh pledged his Government’s commitment to enhance educational infrastructure in the country. Sharing the good work done by his Government in this direction, the Prime Minister informed the nation that courtesy , the Right to Education Act to provide every child in the country the opportunity for education, almost all children in India are today being imparted education in primary schools. he further added, the number of young men and women going to college has more than doubled in the last nine years.

Talking about government’s initiatives in the area of higher education, he referred to setting up of eight new IITs, seven new IIMs, 16 new central universities and 10 new NITs. In addition, he also informed the nation that the total number of the Central government provided scholarships has reached more than two crore children.

8 IITs, 7 IIms, 16 CUs, 10 NITs added since 2004 is great…but:

 

To clarify, there’s nothing wrong in country’s PM informing the nation on the achievements of his Government during his tenure. After all Indian PM doesn’t get much of these opportunities.

41 Central Higher Education institutions and universities in a span of 9 years is good, but the Government must also ensure that the big gap in the quality of education between the top ranked and second fiddle Institutions is reduced. This is important as bearshare of youth is passing out from these second fiddle universities. And he/she is not able to compete in the job market with the passouts from the top institutions.

It’s high time the Government must ensure that a BA from some state University is as much employable as the one passing out from the Delhi University. At least, the ratio of the employable to the total students, is the same. If the Government thinks that it’s not possible to deliver that uniform quality, then it should stop sending every youth in the country to the college. Remember, the five years spent in graduate and postgraduate programmes in these  second fiddle colleges, most of the times, is simply a waste of time. Instead, if the College admissions are made more challenging then a large majority of young men and women will take jobs which don’t particularly require the College Education.

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